Early October at Woodstone

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Lots going on at the barn and at the house.The barn trim is getting painted Agate Gray by Pratt and Lambert (just like the house) and the doors Ben Moore Essex Green. Lights are all installed in the Barn,and my office is basically finished-we are moving there this week to wait out the move into the house in November. The interior windows looking into the rest of the barn are really cool!

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In the house, the tiling and grout are done in all of the bathrooms. Trim is going up on the second floor and they are about to start the first floor. The painters are right behind them. My wonderful wallpaper guy begins in two weeks. The third floor game room is all finished and ready for action!

 

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Late September and the Tree Delivery!

IMG_0985 IMG_0986 IMG_0989IMG_0993FullSizeRender_1 FullSizeRender_2FullSizeRenderWe have now added lots of beautiful new trees to the property-sugar maple,swamp oak,bi-color oak,tupelo,boxwood,locust, shag bark hickory and various bushes.

In addition, in the house-3rd floor is finished-cabinetry and floors in,walls painted. 2nd floor millwork is going in,painters are right behind them. Floors going in next week or two.1st floor is next! All bathrooms tiled and in process of being grouted. Barn office is beautiful and all finished. They are finishing up the shingles on the outside of barn and clapboard on house.

Pictures soon- we are getting there!

Mid-July at Woodstone

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Outside lots going on-granite steps just installed,stone walls going in,clapboards starting to go in the back of the house,trim work almost finished.

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Up on third floor all wallboard and plastering done-now millwork going in!

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The tile has arrived and he is getting the showers all ready for the tile man who comes on Monday.

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And the Barn has it’s roof-in red cedar. My office is coming along. The bookshelves are going in,floors are in,windows are coming in the next week or two. The stone veneer along the base is all completed. We are getting there!

Woodstone in Early July

Lots going on all of a sudden! Stone fireplace on screened porch is finished-complete with a piece of the barn wood as the mantle…stone wall going up in front of the house…lots of trim going on house…then the clapboards start going on….barn roof shingles going on….columns to go on porches have started to arrive….

On the inside of the house, wallboards and plaster…starting to look like real rooms now. A workman made the smiley face-I have to agree!

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Woodstone in June

Lots going on at the house and the barn-that is for sure! Inside the house the plumbing and electrical have all been installed, inspected and now the insulation is going in. We are using closed cell foam insulation that has a higher R value, will give the house a smaller carbon footprint and is the best insulation you can use right now.

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What a mess when they are finished spraying!

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On the exterior, lots going on as well. The septic field has been finished to the north of the house. In the front of the house they are digging to create the space to put the drainage pipes from the gutters for the rainwater to drain into the field. They are also starting to build the stone wall which will be on the south and west side of the house,as well as a stone wall around an area north of the house. In addition, they are creating a veneer with stones around the base of the barn.

The inside of the barn is moving quickly- we have now finished the wood shop and the garden shed and are working on my office.

The trim is going up on the house and the barn. When that is finished, the barn will be shingled in red cedar and the house will have clapboards that are pre-painted in Agate Gray 2213 (very soft off-white) by Pratt and Lambert. We are waiting for the windows to come for the barn as well. All windows on barn and house are also Agate Gray. The windows on the house came to us pre-painted by Little Harbor in Berwick, Maine. They also made the doors which are already painted in Ben Moore Essex Green.

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The apple trees that we moved last summer…only one has made it. A real bummer-was a very tough winter for them. We did put in 7 new ones too-they are doing great!

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“Too Perfect To Pass Up”!

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CONCORD — Harvesting asparagus is back-breaking work. “There’s a lot of up and down, moving down the row,” says Lise Holdorf of Barrett’s Mill Farm as she and business partner Melissa Maxwell and assistant grower Rachel Klepner stoop to cut the green spears about an inch or two above the ground. Their white buckets fill with asparagus still warm from their soil cradle. They’ll repeat this early morning routine every day through mid-June until the field is picked clean.

Holdorf, 35, and Maxwell, 33, have operated Barrett’s Mill Farm for a year. Holdorf was raised here, Maxwell in Connecticut. They have a five-year lease from the Town of Concord and live in the farmhouse on the land. In order to make the finances work, they’re in the fields six long days a week and do occasional odd jobs on Sundays.

Asparagus is a perennial crop that Barrett’s Mill — and the town — is well known for. “This farm, in particular, has sandy, well-drained soil that is great for asparagus and strawberries,” says Maxwell. Local restaurant 80 Thoreau makes good use of the flavorful spears on its menus. Co-owner and general manager Ian Calhoun, who lives down the road from the farm, stops by a few mornings each week to buy asparagus for the restaurant. “It’s exciting to see a couple of younger farmers take over stewardship of the land,” he says.

“The beginning of June is when [the farm] takes off,” says Maxwell. Strawberries ripen, along with radishes, salad greens, sugar snaps, beets, and herbs. The farm’s Community Supported Agriculture starts on June 9. For the 20-week season, members can fill up a tote bag with harvested vegetables and also venture into the pick-your-own fields to rustle up some strawberries and additional veggies. The farm’s Barrett’s Bucks program, says Holdorf, “is a smaller commitment and you don’t have to come every week.” (Bucks cost $275 for an equivalent farm store credit; a CSA share is $660.)

The farm became available after former owner Patrick McGrath died in 2012. The town bought the century-old farmstead and in December 2013 requested proposals from farmers who wanted to lease the property. Included are approximately 12 tillable acres, a residence, greenhouse, farm stand, and barn. The women’s business plan was chosen by the town and in March 2014, the two moved in, Holdorf with her husband, Matt Conroy, a high school teacher, and baby daughter Cyra.

Holdorf was happy to return to the town where she grew up. “It was too perfect to pass up,” she says. Maxwell had been looking for a farm for a number of years. “It’s unique in this area to find something that could support two people, she says. The women had worked together for a half-dozen years at Appleton Farms in Ipswich.

With a full year under their belts, the duo is expanding the planted fields from 4 to 6 acres. “We started small,” says Holdorf, adding that they benefited from lots of helping hands. “The neighbors and farming community in town all supported us,” says Maxwell. In addition to the 50 or so vegetables and herbs they grew last season, this year they’ll be harvesting strawberries, garlic (scapes will be available mid-June, the bulbs in the fall), cipollini onions, red onions, and a mini broccoli variety called Happy Rich.

As women farmers, Holdorf and Maxwell are in good company. According to the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, female farmers represent 32 percent of all principal operators in the state. That’s more than double the 14 percent of women principal operators nationwide, according to 2012 data. The disparity is due mostly to the abundance of small farms in the Bay State — there are over 7,700 farms, many of which are just a few acres in size — as compared to mega operations in other regions.

The Barrett’s Mill lease costs the women $1,400 per month, which includes the farm land, buildings, and residence. The duo invested their own money in used tractors and implements as well as tools and supplies to build tables for a greenhouse and farm stand. Before they moved in, the Concord Housing Foundation had raised funds for renovations to the farmhouse and to convert it into a two-family home to accommodate two farmers. “It’s in excellent condition and a good place for a family to live,” says Holdorf.

The farmers made a small profit in the first year. “We did a careful budget over the winter,” says Holdorf, which allowed them to hire one full-time grower and four part-time field and farm stand workers for spring and summer. “This year we’re hoping for long-term sustainable income for us,” she says.

In Concord, both Macone Farm and First Root Farm are owned by women. Susan Macone, 64, has run what was her family farm since the early 1980s. “We do everything the old-fashioned way,” she says, growing award-winning tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, squash, green beans, and other vegetables. She sells her produce at the neighboring Brigham Farm Stand.

First Root owner Laura Sackton, 29, grew up in nearby Lexington and currently manages 4-plus acres with Cheryl Nunes. They grow about 40 different vegetables, most of which are sold to 225 CSA members. Sackton, who cofounded the farm in 2009, says, “A lot of young people who didn’t grow up on farms are being drawn to farming.” For her, the satisfaction comes with “being outside and the hands-on, always changing work.” The young farmer speaks highly of Concord as a place to set down roots. “It has a supportive agricultural community and people are excited to buy local food.”

Concord also has a vivid history. Directly across the road from Barrett’s Mill Farm sits the old, brown and weathered Colonel James Barrett House, part of the Minute Man National Historical Park. The colonel (and his home) played a key role in the first battle — and first victory — of the Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775. After Paul Revere warned of the British Redcoats’ advance, the story goes that Barrett’s sons buried the Colonial militia’s weapons and munitions in the fields around the house to hide them from the British.

While the land is old, the Barrett’s Mill farmers are new and as dedicated as their forebears. With every planting (and plowing and weeding and harvest), they’re hoping the soil will be fruitful for at least another 100 years.

BARRETT’S MILL FARM

449 Barrett’s Mill Road, Concord, 978-254-5609, www.barrettsmillfarm.com

in Boston Globe,Wednesday June 3, 2015 by Lisa Zwern

Shiny As A Penny At Woodstone

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Without much of a pitch on the east and west porches and the front south porch,we decided to go with copper.Pictured above he is soldering the pieces of copper together on the east porch. We also decided to do copper on the cupola as an accent. The rest of the roof is red cedar.

Cooper roofing is an increasingly popular metal roofing option. The high sheen of brand new copper settles into a blue-green patina over time. Both hues can complement your home and give it a classic, unique flavor. There’s no doubt that copper roofing is beautiful, but its appeal doesn’t stop there. These are some of it’s attributes:

  • Durability – Copper roofs are strong, lasting up to 50 years or even more with regular repairs and maintenance. The metal is highly resistant to fire, hail, and mildew.
  • Weight – Copper is a lightweight material, which is a clear benefit when installed as your main roofing structure. Lightweight roofs do not put as much stress on your home’s internal structures as heavier materials such as steel, clay tiles, or wood shakes. This is especially important during heavy snowfalls.
  • Efficiency – Most metal roofs are energy efficient, as they reflect light instead of allowing heat into the home. Copper is no exception. Installing a copper roof can help you control heating and cooling costs.

The drawbacks of copper roofing are few, but are worth noting. The noise factor can be a negative. A rainstorm sounds loud under a copper roof, no matter where you are in the home. The metal does not buffer noise as well as softer materials, like asphalt or wood.