Shiny As A Penny At Woodstone

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Without much of a pitch on the east and west porches and the front south porch,we decided to go with copper.Pictured above he is soldering the pieces of copper together on the east porch. We also decided to do copper on the cupola as an accent. The rest of the roof is red cedar.

Cooper roofing is an increasingly popular metal roofing option. The high sheen of brand new copper settles into a blue-green patina over time. Both hues can complement your home and give it a classic, unique flavor. There’s no doubt that copper roofing is beautiful, but its appeal doesn’t stop there. These are some of it’s attributes:

  • Durability – Copper roofs are strong, lasting up to 50 years or even more with regular repairs and maintenance. The metal is highly resistant to fire, hail, and mildew.
  • Weight – Copper is a lightweight material, which is a clear benefit when installed as your main roofing structure. Lightweight roofs do not put as much stress on your home’s internal structures as heavier materials such as steel, clay tiles, or wood shakes. This is especially important during heavy snowfalls.
  • Efficiency – Most metal roofs are energy efficient, as they reflect light instead of allowing heat into the home. Copper is no exception. Installing a copper roof can help you control heating and cooling costs.

The drawbacks of copper roofing are few, but are worth noting. The noise factor can be a negative. A rainstorm sounds loud under a copper roof, no matter where you are in the home. The metal does not buffer noise as well as softer materials, like asphalt or wood.

The Raising of the Woodstone Cupola

 

 

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Weighing in at 4500 pounds it was fascinating to see the cupola fly through the air and into place on top of the barn-next step is to add the windows next week!

A cupola (pronounced “kyou’puh luh”) is a structure that sits atop a larger rooftop or dome and can range in size from very basic and small, to extremely large and ornate. The small can be a simple vented box you would see on a barn while the cupola on St.Peters Basilica in Rome is an example of the other extreme.

Large Cupolas may be accessible from a stairway on the inside giving a commanding vantage point from which to look out over the world.  This kind of cupola is often called a belvedere or a “widow’s walk”.  Often smaller cupolas are constructed without access from inside and windows are added which provide a natural light source for illuminating the spaces below. These types of cupolas are also known as “lanterns”.

The origins and history of the Cupola can be traced back to 8th century Islamic architecture. These first cupolas placed atop minarets, were large and sometimes ornate structures with one or more balconies from which the daily call to prayer would be announced. These early cupolas are very significant because they are believed to be the inspiration for the dome which led to massive achievements in architectural design. These bold new designs that emerged were used as symbols for proof of cultural superiority. During the renaissance, most major european cities and Islamic states were building a plethora of these magnificent buildings. The cupola had evolved to allow architecture to become a very artistic and creative status symbol and today, the cupola stands as a statement of a major achievement in architecture.

Woodstone in May

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This is where we are now with Woodstone. House is being wired,plumbing going in,heat and so on….porches to east and west going on,barn is really coming together and very cool…..new apple trees being planted…..cupola is in the background of the first photo-about to be put up on top of barn this weekend…..

Woodstone Barn Update

 

 

 

 

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The old boards, made of wooden sheathing, look pretty crazy from the exterior but the interior is really starting to take shape.The timbers are walnut,chestnut and oak and it is all starting to look like an old barn-which of course, it is!

The guys have been working incredibly hard despite the several feet of snow and very cold temperatures. Soon the boards will be covered in insulation(SIPS-Structural Insulated Panel Systems) on the exterior, and then a final wall will go up with shingles.

Moving Fast!

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People kept telling me that when the framers arrive it all starts going quickly and that has definitely been true the last two days.  What was also a lot of fun was that the barn from Pennsylvania arrived today as well. In the next week or two they will be putting it back together,piece by piece. As Ian(the barn guy) told me,it is like building a piece of Ikea furniture-just a lot bigger!

We Are Floored

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Now we have laid out and installed our floor joist framing system to the proper specifications. The subfloor decking is in.Next the walls will go up and then it will be very exciting to see! The barn is coming from Pennsylvania in the next week or two. It is all taken apart and they will reassemble at the property-the foundation is all ready for it.

Hart Associates

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Of course the first thing you want when building a house is a great architecture firm.We were lucky-we already knew Jen Hart of Hart Associates and knew that she really likes what we like:to make a new house look old. Jen’s touches and thoughts will hopefully lead our house to look like it was always there when people drive by- they will think it is a farmhouse  built a century ago. Jen and  her team are also very involved with the barn and reconfiguring that when the frame arrives from Pennsylvania.

The foundation for both house and barn are in-next step is to start the framing for the house. Then it will get very exciting!

Construction Begins At Woodstone

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Using a backhoe and a bulldozer, the crew clears the site of rocks, debris and trees for the house and the septic system. The crew levels the site, puts up wooden forms to serve as a template for the foundation, and digs the holes and trenches. Footings (structures where the house interfaces with the earth that supports it) are installed.

The hole is dug for the full basement, the footings are formed and poured, and the foundation walls are formed and poured. The area between them is leveled and fitted with utility runs (e.g. plumbing drains and electrical chases).

After the concrete is cured, the crew applies a waterproofing membrane to the foundation walls; installs drains, sewer and water taps and any plumbing that needs to go into the basement floor; and backfills excavated dirt into the hole around the foundation wall.

This next week will be exciting as the lumber is being delivered and the walls will start going up. The barn foundation is also being poured this week and the old barn form from Pennsylvania will arrive early next week.

Woodstone Barn

 

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The next piece was figuring out how and where to get an older barn and be able to relocate it to our property. Quite by chance we located a company that does exactly that. Colonial Barn Restoration-check out their website,it is amazing what they can do to a barn!They have located a barn for us from Pennsylvania-3 miles from where my husband grew up,so it is very special.

Here is an excerpt  from their website describing what they do:

As the price of land rises, people in this area subdivide their land into smaller and smaller lots. We have been involved with a number of projects where an antique barn was located on a subdivided lot. The owners wanted to keep the barn with the original house on the property so we moved the barn over on the same property. Since then we have learned the ins and outs of moving buildings and have moved several. Moving buildings in one piece is very economical. The state of Massachusetts even takes down power lines for free to help facilitate the move.Often times our clients want to move a barn frame a long distance or there are too many trees in the way to move it to its new location in one piece. We have lots of experience taking apart and reassembling barns in new locations.When we take a barn completely apart we have a chance to inspect every structural element and make any needed repairs. We can also make slight changes to the frame to satisfy building code restraints or change the layout slightly for modern uses. We have a design and engineering team to help make these changes.We often use reclaimed lumber for repairs so that they are not as apparent.