It’s The Hard Days That Determine Who You Are

Having just lost my mother 3 weeks ago,a lot of this rang true for me-very good speech and one everyone should read- wherever you are in life.

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Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook and author of “Lean In,’’ delivered the commencement speech at the University of California, Berkeley, on Saturday. Below is an edited version of her remarks.

I AM NOT here to tell you all the things I’ve learned in life. Today I will try to tell you what I learned in death.

One year and 13 days ago, I lost my husband, Dave. His death was sudden and unexpected. We were at a friend’s 50th birthday party in Mexico. I took a nap. Dave went to work out. What followed was the unthinkable — walking into a gym to find him lying on the floor. Flying home to tell my children that their father was gone. Watching his casket being lowered into the ground.

For many months afterward, and at many times since, I was swallowed up in the deep fog of grief — what I think of as the void — an emptiness that fills your heart, your lungs, constricts your ability to think or even to breathe.

Dave’s death changed me in profound ways. I learned about the depths of sadness and the brutality of loss. But I also learned that when life sucks you under, you can kick against the bottom, break the surface, and breathe again. I learned that in the face of the void — or in the face of any challenge — you can choose joy and meaning.

I’m sharing this with you in the hope that today, as you take the next step in your life, you can learn the lessons that I learned only in death. Lessons about hope, strength, and the light within us that will not be extinguished.

You will almost certainly face deep adversity. There’s loss of opportunity: the job that doesn’t work out, the illness or accident that changes everything in an instant. There’s loss of dignity: the sharp sting of prejudice when it happens. There’s loss of love. And sometimes there’s loss of life itself.

The question is not if some of these things will happen to you. They will. Today I want to talk about what happens next. About the things you can do to overcome adversity, no matter what form it takes or when it hits you. The easy days ahead of you will be easy. It is the hard days — the times that challenge you to your very core — that will determine who you are. You will be defined not just by what you achieve, but by how you survive.

A few weeks after Dave died, I was talking to my friend Phil about a father-son activity that Dave was not here to do. We came up with a plan to fill in for Dave. I cried to him, “But I want Dave.” Phil put his arm around me and said, “Option A is not available. So let’s just kick the shit out of option B.”

We all at some point live some form of option B. The question is: What do we do then?

Psychologist Martin Seligman found that there are three P’s — personalization, pervasiveness, and permanence — that are critical to how we bounce back from hardship. The seeds of resilience are planted in the way we process the negative events in our lives.

The first P is personalization — the belief that we are at fault. This is different from taking responsibility, which you should always do. This is the lesson that not everything that happens to us happens because of us.

When Dave died, I had a very common reaction, which was to blame myself. He died in seconds, from a cardiac arrhythmia. I poured over his medical records asking what I could have — or should have — done. It wasn’t until I learned about the three P’s that I accepted that I could not have prevented his death. His doctors had not identified his coronary artery disease. I was an economics major; how could I have?

Studies show that getting past personalization can actually make you stronger. Not taking failures personally allows us to recover — and even to thrive.

The second P is pervasiveness — the belief that an event will affect all areas of your life. There’s no place to run or hide from the all-consuming sadness.

The child psychologists I spoke to encouraged me to get my kids back to their routine as soon as possible. So 10 days after Dave died, they went back to school and I went back to work. I remember sitting in my first Facebook meeting in a deep, deep haze. All I could think was, “What is everyone talking about and how could this possibly matter?” But then I got drawn into the discussion, and for a second — a brief split second — I forgot about death.

That brief second helped me see that there were other things in my life that were not awful. My children and I were healthy. My friends and family were so loving, and they carried us — quite literally, at times.

The loss of a partner often has severe negative financial consequences, especially for women. So many single mothers — and fathers — struggle to make ends meet or have jobs that don’t allow them the time they need to care for their children. I had financial security, the ability to take the time off I needed, and a job that I did not just believe in, but where it’s actually OK to spend all day on Facebook. Gradually, my children started sleeping through the night, crying less, playing more.

The third P is permanence — the belief that the sorrow will last forever. For months, no matter what I did, it felt like the crushing grief would always be there.

We often project our current feelings out indefinitely — and experience what I think of as the second derivative of those feelings. We feel anxious — and then we feel anxious that we’re anxious. We feel sad — and then we feel sad that we’re sad. Instead, we should accept our feelings — but recognize that they will not last forever. My rabbi told me that time would heal, but for now I should “lean in to the suck.” It was good advice, but not really what I meant by “lean in.”

But I wish I had known about the three P’s when I was your age. There were so many times these lessons would have helped.

One day my friend Adam Grant, a psychologist, suggested that I think about how much worse things could be. This was completely counterintuitive; it seemed like the way to recover was to try to find positive thoughts. “Worse?” I said. “Are you crazy? How could things be worse?” His answer cut straight through me: “Dave could have had that same cardiac arrhythmia while he was driving your children.” Wow. The moment he said it, I felt overwhelming gratitude that my family was alive. That gratitude overtook some of the grief.

Finding gratitude and appreciation is key to resilience. People who take the time to list things they are grateful for are happier and healthier. It turns out that counting your blessings can actually increase your blessings. My New Year’s resolution this year is to write down three moments of joy before I go to bed each night. This simple practice has changed my life. Because no matter what happens each day, I go to sleep thinking of something cheerful.

Last month, 11 days before the anniversary of Dave’s death, I broke down crying to a friend of mine. We were sitting — of all places — on a bathroom floor. I said: “Eleven days. One year ago, he had 11 days left. And we had no idea.” We looked at each other through tears, and asked how we would live if we knew we had 11 days left.

As you graduate, can you ask yourselves to live as if you had 11 days left? I don’t mean blow everything off and party all the time. I mean live with the understanding of how precious every single day would be. How precious every day actually is.

As I stand here today, a year after the worst day of my life, two things are true. I have a huge reservoir of sadness that is with me always — right here, where I can touch it. I never knew I could cry so often — or so much.

But I am also aware that I am walking without pain. For the first time, I am grateful for each breath in and out — grateful for the gift of life itself. I used to celebrate my birthday every five years, and friends’ birthdays sometimes. Now I celebrate always. I used to go to sleep worrying about all the things I messed up that day — and trust me, that list was often quite long. Now I try hard to focus on each day’s moments of joy.

It is the greatest irony of my life that losing my husband helped me find deeper gratitude — gratitude for the kindness of my friends, the love of my family, the laughter of my children. My hope for you is that you can find that gratitude — not just on the good days, but on the hard ones, when you will really need it.

I hope that you live your life — each precious day of it — with joy and meaning. I hope that you walk without pain — and that you are grateful for each step.

And when the challenges come, I hope you remember that anchored deep within you is the ability to learn and grow. You are not born with a fixed amount of resilience. Like a muscle, you can build it up, draw on it when you need it. In that process you will figure out who you really are — and you just might become the very best version of yourself.

We Are Not That Old!

 

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Thought this was fun to read in the Boston Globe today so thought I would share-I added pictures of true examples!

REMEMBER THE legend of Ponce de Leon, the 16th century explorer who discovered the Fountain of Youth in, of all places, Florida? The story goes that this magical water source was capable of reversing the aging process and curing sickness.

Well, it turns out that Ponce de Leon’s got nothing on current-day “explorers” when it comes to turning back the hands of time.

Researchers from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and Stony Brook University recently released a study that suggests the start of middle age is no longer 45 or 50 but, instead, 60.

That’s right: 60 really is the new 50. Boomers, rejoice!

Life expectancy is increasing at a faster rate than ever. The Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital projects an increase in life expectancy of 1.4 years per decade in Europe. In response, according to the study, the definitions of “old” and “middle age” have to change. Rather than basing age categories on the amount of time someone has lived so far, the researchers argue that the categories should be based, instead, on the amount of time one has left to live.

“What we think of as old has changed over time, and it will need to continue changing in the future as people live longer, healthier lives,” says Sergei Scherbov, coleader of the study.

For a generation that’s so allergic to the thought of aging that the mere mention of “Social Security” or “AARP discount” can induce anaphylactic shock, this is the best news since the invention of Botox.

 So long as the definers of age keep moving the goalpost, boomers may never have to grow old.

I wish I’d known this sooner. Here I was, believing that being in my 50s meant I’m middle aged, when, really, I’m still terribly young. What a fool I’ve been, going to sleep by 11:30. I could be pulling all-nighters. To think I gave up tennis because an orthopedist apparently misdiagnosed my shoulder pain as osteoarthritis. That’s a condition for middle-aged people, not a young, athletic woman like myself. And all the technology and devices I have trouble learning? That’s not a sign of age, that’s just a sign of stupidity. Whew.

The current research seems to echo findings by Bernice Neugarten, a pioneer in the study of adult development, who began arguing for a more complex view of aging decades ago. One of her most significant contributions to the field was to differentiate the “young-old” from the “old-old” rather than categorize people who are decades apart the same way. But, today, many of the “young-old” would be called middle aged.

Today’s research also confirms what we’ve already known, anecdotally: Good health, an active lifestyle, and a young attitude may have more to do with a person’s “age” than their date of birth. You don’t have to look any further for proof than last week’s Boston Marathon, where a dozen men and women in their 80s qualified to run. These incredibly fit Marathoners are definitely not your parents’ grandpas and grandmas.

Speaking of grandmas . . . maybe the revised age categorization will put to rest concerns about the age of the potential future Grandma-in-Chief Hillary Clinton. If elected, she’ll be 69 when she assumes the presidency. That means she’ll only be middle aged. And, if researchers continue to revise the age definitions, Hillary could miraculously still be middle aged even at the end of two terms in office.

I can see it now: the next Clinton conspiracy theory. Clinton’s opponents will start floating a rumor that the Clinton Foundation was behind this research study.

If that turns out to be true, one thing’s for sure: Clinton will win the vote of grateful boomers everywhere.

Meta Wagner is a contributor to the Boston Globe Opinion pages. Follow her on Twitter @meta_wagner1.

 

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