Roof Lines-The Building of A House

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I am helping a client build a house on a beautiful piece of property here in Concord. While it is thrilling,exciting and all that, there are loads of decisions to be made.

Foremost in their minds is to create a house that looks like it was always there. The property is on an old historic road surrounded by low stone walls,beautiful old maples and gorgeous meadows. The last thing they want to do is look like they have disrupted the landscape and plopped a house in the middle of it.

One of things we are all discussing now is the roof line…should they do a hip roof or a pitched roof?Which is more appropriate for a farm setting? The pitch roof seems more like a farm house but the way the architect has drawn the proposed house with a hip roof , the front elevation  looks a little smaller and more interesting. I also checked out the history in New England regarding this because they want the house to be historically correct. There seems to be an equal split as to the popularity of both, although you do see more of the pitched roof in a country setting.

Menauhant & More House Tour Preview Salon

This is a presentation I gave on Thursday, July 18 at Highfield Hall in Falmouth, MA. I spoke about the renovation and additions we did to our summer home on the Cape.

Lauren Huyett Highfield Hall Salon sitetx. Click on the blue highlighted words here. Please note it will take a few minutes to download the PowerPoint document to your computer.

Menauhant & More House Tour

A True Family Home on the Cape

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We went to visit friends here on the Cape who had renovated their house-gutted it completely. It was originally 3 small cottages from the mid 1800’s that had been made into one home years ago but as our friend said “you went up and down steps” to get to parts of each house. They created more of a logical house in the space-and it is incredible. From the beautiful views to the little details-they had a lot of fun with this project.

I loved the lighting fixtures-they were all made by Eloise Pickard of Sandy Springs Gallery. I also loved the way the owners turned the couches in the living room to look out at the views instead of the more traditional facing a fireplace or facing each other. After all, the views are incredible as they are right near the water.

The pop of aqua in the mudroom,the barstools with both San Francisco and Boston teams to celebrate the owners’ home town teams, the “Lilly” guest room with dresses she had framed from her girls when they were small, the really fun laundry room floor…all of it adds up to a home well-loved and very much showing the creativity and cleverness of the owners.

Install at Lake House

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We had a lot of fun yesterday installing window treatments in a house on a lake that has been recently renovated. The Duralee and Thibaut fabrics are all fun and lovely together-they really reflect the personality of the client!

Monticello-Charlottesville, Virginia

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In thinking of spring, I always think of going to Virginia-the prettiest place in the world when it is spring.This article caught my eye!

Jefferson’s historic house gets a bold coat of paint
BY MITCHELL OWEN
Hip and modern aren’t words necessarily associated with historic sites, let alone Monticello. The country house of Thomas Jefferson, America’s third president and likely its most intelligent—as John F. Kennedy once told a group of dignitaries visiting the White House, theirs was the greatest gathering of minds since Jefferson dined alone—has long been an icon in the national imagination. Its gently swelling dome and its columned portico even appear on the U.S. nickel. But this summer, visitors arriving at the mountaintop house Jefferson designed for himself in 1769 near Charlottesville, Virginia, are in for a shock: The beloved Wedgwood-blue dining room has been painted a rich, raucous shade known as chrome-yellow. The past is now so bright you gotta wear shades.

“The blue dated from 1936,” says Susan R. Stein, Monticello’s energetic curator and overseer of the thought-provoking reinterpretation. “So we began to do paint studies and concluded this chrome-yellow shade was applied to the dining room around 1815, only six years after it was invented in France.” Like anything on the cutting edge of fashion, it was expensive. Back then, chrome-yellow, which Stein eloquently describes as “the color of an egg yolk from a chicken that dined on marigold petals,” cost $5 per pound to produce versus 15 cents per pound for basic white. Better yet, the color was a new product that would have appealed greatly to Jefferson, then in his early 70s but still impassioned about scientific advancements, even if his housekeeping left something to be desired. (A visitor complained that the seats in the dining room around the time it was painted yellow were “completely worn through and the hair [stuffing] sticking out in all directions.”)

Today that space, just off the main hall—restored and repainted thanks to a generous donation from Polo Ralph Lauren—is an invigorating tour de force, awash with sunlight streaming beneath the crisp pediments of its triple-hung windows. The mahogany shield-back side chairs Jefferson probably bought in New York City are thrown into high relief, looking rather like cut-paper silhouettes. His paintings and prints, which once blended modestly into the dull-blue walls, now pop into view, their black frames crisp against the bold yellow. The whole room seems buoyant, the yellow reflected in the gilded mirror and suffusing the Palladian-flavored white moldings with a golden glow day and night.

“It takes some getting used to, but Jefferson was an experimenter, a forward thinker,” observes interior designer Charlotte Moss, a native Virginian who is still rubbing her eyes in disbelief after a preview a few months ago. “The yellow is more representative of who he really was, an educated man of the world, than that pale blue.” Moss was invited to create an array of table settings for the dining room, and the results prove how truly modern and appealing the room remains.

A fresh coat of paint isn’t the only change at Monticello. A mahogany sideboard has been added to the dining room, in emulation of one Jefferson owned. The South Pavilion, a two-room brick garden house where the newlywed Jeffersons first lived, has been furnished to reflect those early days, with a mahogany canopy bed curtained in flowery chintz. A wine cellar dumbwaiter has been rendered operable for the first time in decades, the kitchen now features an eight-burner stove that was the latest word in culinary chic in Jefferson’s day, and a new permanent exhibition is devoted to the slaves, servants, and other individuals who kept Monticello humming. Jefferson’s bedroom is in Stein’s scholarly sights too, as well as a blue room that may originally have been painted black. History, a dead thing? Think again.

Spring Cleaning!

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Here are some quick tips…..

1.Use dust pan to fill up bucket for mopping
2.Use dryer sheets to remove buildup from glass
3.Use coffee filters to clean TV screens
4.Use a lemon to get rid of water stains
5.Keep cleaning supplies neat with a tension rod

Have fun!

Deetjen’s Big Sur Inn

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Thanks to my cousin who recommended Deetjen’s we stayed here.It is so charming and you really have the chance to relax-no cell phones,no TV,no internet….here is some history:

Before Highway One was completed in 1937, Castro Canyon was a traditional stopover for travelers along the coastal wagon road. When Helmuth and Helen Deetjen began welcoming guests in the 1930’s, Deetjens Inn was born.Over the years Deetjen built Norwegian-style rooms and gave each of them a name. All work was done by Grandpa Deetjen and friends using locally milled,scavenged redwood.
Today the Big Sur Inn is on the National Register of Historic Places, offering visitors simple luxuries in the rooms and fabulous dining in the award-winning restaurant. Year round, the Inn’s well-tended gardens bloom and the Castro Canyon waterfall splashes into the creek. Their guests often say that a visit to Deetjens feels like coming home-there is a guestbook in each room and it was fun to read the entries in our room! We noticed that many people make a yearly trek to Deetjen’s.