A Lotta Love-Donating A Room

 I want to share this with all-it really warms your heart to see how much decorating can really make a very dismal area home for these residents. A friend in North Carolina sent this to me:
Thought you would enjoy seeing what’s happening at the local Women and Children’s shelter here.  Such a great idea.  When the residents are able to leave they get to take their new decor stuff with them so the organization is continually seeking volunteers in the community to redo rooms for new residents.  The service league I belong to helped a few years ago back when it all began two years ago but I had not seen the complete transformation.  Anyway – given your line of work I thought this video that shows the power of making a place “home” would really warm your heart.

Settling into Woodstone

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We got moved in for Christmas and had such a great time with everyone home. It was incredible to me that we even got the Santa and Snowmen collections out and the little dog tree. Our new kitchen table worked great-wonderful for our large family.

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It was great to get the art work unpacked-especially the 5 black and white photos of our kids that were taken 20 years ago. I also always feel like it is home after I get the needlepoints with our kids names up too-my sister did those as each child was born. We also hung the paintings that our daughters each did as gifts to us over the years.

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And it was great to see the ping pong table again-it had been in storage for 9 years as it never worked in our old house on Main Street.

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While we used all of of our existing furniture there were some “news” which was a lot of fun too!

Home Stretch at Woodstone

Wallpapers and grasscloth are installed on the first floor.Trim almost all painted and Family Room my favorite green- Saguaro by C2 Paints. Parquet floor in front hallway is finished but needs a couple more coats which happened this weekend.  The screen porch is begun-they can finish that after we move in. The mudroom tile is in. Brass locks have been installed as well as most knobs and pulls. The kitchen island is in and the granite comes Friday for that and all counters. The columns outside were all painted on Saturday,after these photos were taken. Move in this week!

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Final Touches at Woodstone

We are moving in next week!! This is the fun time-seeing all of the lights we have picked out over the last year ,the fixtures,the wallpapers and paint colors,the knobs,the mantle details,the column(exterior) details,cabinetry and so on.The floors are all done now-first floor just needs two more coats next weekend and then good to go!

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Mid-July at Woodstone

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Outside lots going on-granite steps just installed,stone walls going in,clapboards starting to go in the back of the house,trim work almost finished.

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Up on third floor all wallboard and plastering done-now millwork going in!

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The tile has arrived and he is getting the showers all ready for the tile man who comes on Monday.

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And the Barn has it’s roof-in red cedar. My office is coming along. The bookshelves are going in,floors are in,windows are coming in the next week or two. The stone veneer along the base is all completed. We are getting there!

Woodstone in June

Lots going on at the house and the barn-that is for sure! Inside the house the plumbing and electrical have all been installed, inspected and now the insulation is going in. We are using closed cell foam insulation that has a higher R value, will give the house a smaller carbon footprint and is the best insulation you can use right now.

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What a mess when they are finished spraying!

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On the exterior, lots going on as well. The septic field has been finished to the north of the house. In the front of the house they are digging to create the space to put the drainage pipes from the gutters for the rainwater to drain into the field. They are also starting to build the stone wall which will be on the south and west side of the house,as well as a stone wall around an area north of the house. In addition, they are creating a veneer with stones around the base of the barn.

The inside of the barn is moving quickly- we have now finished the wood shop and the garden shed and are working on my office.

The trim is going up on the house and the barn. When that is finished, the barn will be shingled in red cedar and the house will have clapboards that are pre-painted in Agate Gray 2213 (very soft off-white) by Pratt and Lambert. We are waiting for the windows to come for the barn as well. All windows on barn and house are also Agate Gray. The windows on the house came to us pre-painted by Little Harbor in Berwick, Maine. They also made the doors which are already painted in Ben Moore Essex Green.

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The apple trees that we moved last summer…only one has made it. A real bummer-was a very tough winter for them. We did put in 7 new ones too-they are doing great!

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Shiny As A Penny At Woodstone

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Without much of a pitch on the east and west porches and the front south porch,we decided to go with copper.Pictured above he is soldering the pieces of copper together on the east porch. We also decided to do copper on the cupola as an accent. The rest of the roof is red cedar.

Cooper roofing is an increasingly popular metal roofing option. The high sheen of brand new copper settles into a blue-green patina over time. Both hues can complement your home and give it a classic, unique flavor. There’s no doubt that copper roofing is beautiful, but its appeal doesn’t stop there. These are some of it’s attributes:

  • Durability – Copper roofs are strong, lasting up to 50 years or even more with regular repairs and maintenance. The metal is highly resistant to fire, hail, and mildew.
  • Weight – Copper is a lightweight material, which is a clear benefit when installed as your main roofing structure. Lightweight roofs do not put as much stress on your home’s internal structures as heavier materials such as steel, clay tiles, or wood shakes. This is especially important during heavy snowfalls.
  • Efficiency – Most metal roofs are energy efficient, as they reflect light instead of allowing heat into the home. Copper is no exception. Installing a copper roof can help you control heating and cooling costs.

The drawbacks of copper roofing are few, but are worth noting. The noise factor can be a negative. A rainstorm sounds loud under a copper roof, no matter where you are in the home. The metal does not buffer noise as well as softer materials, like asphalt or wood.

Architect Francis Fleetwood

 

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This style of house is certainly very popular-I thought the perception of why this seems to be true is interesting.

 

NEW YORK — Francis Fleetwood, who drew on the work of Stanford White to transform the architectural aesthetic of the Hamptons on Long Island from the relatively modest, minimalist beach houses that reflected postwar modernism to the shingled Victorian behemoths that evoke the Gilded Age, died May 8 at his home in Wellington, Fla. He was 68.

The cause was a blood clot, his brother, Blake, said.

After opening his own firm, Fleetwood & McMullan, in 1980, Mr. Fleetwood designed more than 200 homes in the Hamptons, many of them encompassing tens of thousands of square feet, costing tens of millions of dollars and commissioned by clients who did not blink at the price.

Among them were celebrities like Alec Baldwin, Lauren Bacall, Calvin Klein, and Paul McCartney, as well as private-equity investors and commodities traders who would let Architectural Digest photograph their trophy habitats on the condition that the magazine not reveal their names.

Architects of the angular, flat-roofed houses that proliferated on the East End of Long Island in the 1950s and beyond also catered to the wealthy. But those buildings — made of wood, stone, poured concrete and glass — were unassuming by comparison. Mr. Fleetwood’s shingled, sprawling creations, produced for a more extravagant moneyed class, suggest a kind of homey grandeur.

“The shingle style is the only truly indigenous architecture of the United States,” Mr. Fleetwood told The New York Times in 1991. “Every other style, including modern architecture, had its roots elsewhere.”

“People are looking for roots,” he said in another interview. “They’d all love to be born into a grand old house that had been handed down through the generations. So would I.”

Francis Freile Fleetwood was born in Santiago, Chile. His father, Harvey, was a banker. His mother, the former Maria Freile, is a psychoanalyst.

Besides his brother and mother, he leaves his wife, Stephanie; a daughter, Catherine Newsome; a stepson, Michael Orhan; three grandchildren; and two sisters, Carmen Paul and Charlotte Fleetwood.

After moving to New York with his mother and older brother before turning 2, he attended the Dalton, Fessenden, and Riverdale Schools, graduated from Bard College and earned a master’s degree in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973.

At Bard, before deciding to pursue a career as an architect, Fleetwood had different designs on the kind of capitalists who would become his clients.

“I was a Marxist back then,” he told the college’s alumni bulletin, “and we would hold secret meetings every week, planning the overthrow of the school, the government, the world.”

Before establishing his own firm, in East Hampton, he worked for an architect in Aspen, Colo., and for Philip Johnson in New York on the AT&T and Neiman Marcus buildings and other projects.

In 2001, Forbes magazine put Mr. Fleetwood on its list of leading architects, calling him “the architect for the A-list in the Hamptons.”

His asymmetrical style featured gables, turrets and expansive porches that connected the interior of his houses to their typically spacious grounds and vistas. Another hallmark was a low, sweeping roofline with an Oriental curvature and red-brick chimneys that rose well above it.

By Sam Roberts NEW YORK TIMES  MAY 27, 2015

Real Estate Idea in Boston

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Interesting idea!

Woodstone Barn Update

 

 

 

 

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The old boards, made of wooden sheathing, look pretty crazy from the exterior but the interior is really starting to take shape.The timbers are walnut,chestnut and oak and it is all starting to look like an old barn-which of course, it is!

The guys have been working incredibly hard despite the several feet of snow and very cold temperatures. Soon the boards will be covered in insulation(SIPS-Structural Insulated Panel Systems) on the exterior, and then a final wall will go up with shingles.

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