Architect Francis Fleetwood

 

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This style of house is certainly very popular-I thought the perception of why this seems to be true is interesting.

 

NEW YORK — Francis Fleetwood, who drew on the work of Stanford White to transform the architectural aesthetic of the Hamptons on Long Island from the relatively modest, minimalist beach houses that reflected postwar modernism to the shingled Victorian behemoths that evoke the Gilded Age, died May 8 at his home in Wellington, Fla. He was 68.

The cause was a blood clot, his brother, Blake, said.

After opening his own firm, Fleetwood & McMullan, in 1980, Mr. Fleetwood designed more than 200 homes in the Hamptons, many of them encompassing tens of thousands of square feet, costing tens of millions of dollars and commissioned by clients who did not blink at the price.

Among them were celebrities like Alec Baldwin, Lauren Bacall, Calvin Klein, and Paul McCartney, as well as private-equity investors and commodities traders who would let Architectural Digest photograph their trophy habitats on the condition that the magazine not reveal their names.

Architects of the angular, flat-roofed houses that proliferated on the East End of Long Island in the 1950s and beyond also catered to the wealthy. But those buildings — made of wood, stone, poured concrete and glass — were unassuming by comparison. Mr. Fleetwood’s shingled, sprawling creations, produced for a more extravagant moneyed class, suggest a kind of homey grandeur.

“The shingle style is the only truly indigenous architecture of the United States,” Mr. Fleetwood told The New York Times in 1991. “Every other style, including modern architecture, had its roots elsewhere.”

“People are looking for roots,” he said in another interview. “They’d all love to be born into a grand old house that had been handed down through the generations. So would I.”

Francis Freile Fleetwood was born in Santiago, Chile. His father, Harvey, was a banker. His mother, the former Maria Freile, is a psychoanalyst.

Besides his brother and mother, he leaves his wife, Stephanie; a daughter, Catherine Newsome; a stepson, Michael Orhan; three grandchildren; and two sisters, Carmen Paul and Charlotte Fleetwood.

After moving to New York with his mother and older brother before turning 2, he attended the Dalton, Fessenden, and Riverdale Schools, graduated from Bard College and earned a master’s degree in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973.

At Bard, before deciding to pursue a career as an architect, Fleetwood had different designs on the kind of capitalists who would become his clients.

“I was a Marxist back then,” he told the college’s alumni bulletin, “and we would hold secret meetings every week, planning the overthrow of the school, the government, the world.”

Before establishing his own firm, in East Hampton, he worked for an architect in Aspen, Colo., and for Philip Johnson in New York on the AT&T and Neiman Marcus buildings and other projects.

In 2001, Forbes magazine put Mr. Fleetwood on its list of leading architects, calling him “the architect for the A-list in the Hamptons.”

His asymmetrical style featured gables, turrets and expansive porches that connected the interior of his houses to their typically spacious grounds and vistas. Another hallmark was a low, sweeping roofline with an Oriental curvature and red-brick chimneys that rose well above it.

By Sam Roberts NEW YORK TIMES  MAY 27, 2015

Window Boxes in Edgartown

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Summer may be over for this year but you can certainly start dreaming about next summer ! Here are some ideas for window boxes that I saw in Edgartown….Happy Labor Day!

Edgartown on the Vineyard

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One of the greatest moments of summer for me is to take my rental bike on our annual anniversary trip to Martha’s Vineyard and just ride around Edgartown and look at the houses,gardens and incredible views….Obama was there on the island as well but it really did not affect the traffic or us tourists!

The Charlotte Inn Gardens

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The Charlotte Inn in Edgartown and it’s gardens are spectacular-I felt absolutely inspired from my weekend there for when I get back home!

Lovely Lake Living

 

 

 

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I finally got the chance to see the finished house I had decorated up in New Hampshire last year.It is on a beautiful lake-perfect setting for relaxing summers! We had a lot of fun picking out the fabrics and I think the client is delighted with the result-it is a very happy house and fun to spend time in,especially on beautiful summer days.

Reflections In Bloom

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A good friend of mine and I were asked to do flowers for an event called “Reflections in Bloom” which took place at Powers Gallery in Acton, Massachusetts. It was to benefit the Emerson Hospital Auxiliary Programs. We were asked to pick one of the rooms in the Art Gallery  and to tie our floral arrangement in to the room we picked.We both loved the “nautical room” and quickly noticed that there was a beautiful antique boat sitting on one of the tables. It turned out that it belonged to the owner of Powers Gallery and he offered it to us to use with our arrangement.

We were both happy at the event last night-as hoped, our arrangement seemed to bring smiles to people’s faces as they fully realized the waves,spray and the sun depicted…….

Fluffernutters in Massachusetts

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This was always a staple in our diet when we came to Cape Cod in the summers from Washington DC so it brings back fond memories. I just always told my kids that there was no Fluff in DC when we returned home!

BOSTON, April 24 (UPI) — Fans of peanut butter and Marshmallow Fluff may want to start looking for housing options in Massachusetts.

A bill that would make the fluffernutter the official state sandwich in Massachusetts was approved at a vote earlier this week during a session of the House of Representatives. According to the bill, “the fluffernutter shall be the sandwich or sandwich emblem of the commonwealth.”

Marshmallow Fluff was invented almost a hundred years ago in Somerville, Mass., and the sandwich — a combination of peanut butter and fluff on bread — is a popular snack in New England.

The main ingredient in the fluffernutter, the fluff, is still produced at a manufacturing plant in Lynn.

The House has to vote on the bill again before it can move on to the Senate.

Not everyone hopes it passes.

“Why the state Legislature feels the need to designate a sandwich is itself questionable. There’s plenty of other pressing business,” said a MassLive editorial. “And if it does, why not choose a sandwich that says Bay State with every bite: Why not choose the mayonnaise-less lobster roll?”

Massachusetts-moves-closer-to-approving-fluffernutter-as-official-state-sandwich

 

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